October 18, 2010
  

Practice pennies, neon green laces, new faces and the promise of a new season not far off -- all signs point to fall ball, college lacrosse's annual rite of initiation.

With 2010 in the books and 2011 in mind, LMO's "Fall Ball Blitz" series checks in with coaches and players around the country for the latest developments.

RECENT "FALL BALL BLITZ" STORIES | ARCHIVE

November 5, 2010
Film Study: Sonoma Eyeing Past Successes
Doug Carl is using his film library to reconnect the Seawolves to their successful heritage.

November 5, 2010
Dolphins' Move to Division II Opens Doors
After three years stuck in Division I purgatory, Le Moyne's deep, dedicated senior class is ready to take D-II by storm.

November 3, 2010
Tiger Time? Hampden-Sydney Optimistic
With an uncharacteristically potent attack blended with its usual midfield and defensive standards, Sydney looks tough.

October 29, 2010
Return of the ‘Mack: Warriors Are Here to Stay
After an NCAA bid in '09 and a NE-10 championship last spring, Merrimack is becoming a consistent power.

October 27, 2010
Georgetown's Touted Freshmen Learn on Fly
Have shoes, will travel. Joel Censer checked in on the Hoyas after an adventurous day of fall ball.


Brown Offense at Crossroads, Scrimmages Reveal

by Chris R. Vaccaro | Special to Lacrosse Magazine Online

With Brown's top scorers either graduating or missing in action (Andrew Feinberg, broken foot)) this fall, midfielder David Hawley, a Williams transfer who scored 26 goals in 2010, is among those shouldering the load in the Bears' new-look offense.

© Greg Wall

It's normally a time to answer preseason questions, but Saturday’s fall ball scrimmages against Stony Brook and Hobart didn’t serve that purpose for the Brown men's lacrosse team. Instead, the Bears seemed to learn more about the obvious things.

Brown's offense is at crossroads after the graduations of Thomas Muldoon, Collins Carey and Reade Seligmann. Andrew Feinberg broke his foot in September workouts, which also doesn’t help things.

During Saturday’s matchups, the Bears struggled on faceoffs. While it’s tough to compete against Stony Brook’s Adam Rand, one of the top draw men in the nation, the Bears did what they could with seniors Seth Ratner and Nick Martell.

Defensively, it was tough to read how Brown might be in a few months. Against Stony Brook, the Bears' defense faltered. But against Hobart, it looked perfectly fine.

Goalie Matt Chriss is now a senior. Last year he started all 14 games and had a 10.46 goals against average.

FALL BALL BLITZ

Team: Brown
2010 Record:
8-6 (4-2 Ivy League)
2010 in Review:
Had it not been for Cornell’s five straight goals in the first-ever Ivy League playoffs, Brown’s 2010 fate may have been different. But the Bears lost, 14-7, ending the year in the semifinals. Feinberg led the team with 36 goals and 43 points. Muldoon followed with 27 goals. Seligmann’s 35 points will be missed.

Goodbye… The team’s major offensive producers are all gone: Muldoon, Seligmann and Carey. All three were leaders. Seligmann, Bears head coach Lars Tiffany said, had great field vision that will be missed. He accounted for over 40 assists in two seasons.

Hello… The main newcomers are Tom Capone, Pete Vivenetto, Phil Pierce and Steve Chmil. “I think they stepped up in their first live action,” Tiffany said after the two games Saturday. Capone was an all-around athlete at Watertown High School in upstate New York, earning 12 varsity letters between football, wrestling and lacrosse. Chmil played at Chaminade on Long Island and was a two-time All-CHSAA selection. Pierce was the Brunswick School’s top male athlete last year in Greenwich, Conn. Vivenetto played at Rocky Point on Long Island. 

Offseason Developments: Tiffany added former Lafayette assistant Scott Dalgilesh and former Virginia All-American Kip Turner as assistants on his coaching staff. 

Big Question: It has to be the offense -- how can it adjust to losing so much talent off the 2010 roster? “I think we might have to be a bit more defined and structured with our offense,” Tiffany said. “I like to develop offensive players that will make plays, as opposed to puppeteering and saying, ‘You go here, you do this.’ We may need a little more direction.”

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