October 27, 2011

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Call to Hall 2011: Davis, Honeysett McKinny, Lanahan Zvosec

by Josh Moyer | LaxMagazine.com | Related: Men's Inductees Allison, Huntley, Lawlor, Reese

Three women — two players and an umpire — will be inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame on Saturday at The Grand Lodge in Hunt Valley, Md.

Traci Davis, the late Suzanne Honeysett McKinny and Sandra Lanahan Zvosec will be honored at the ceremony, joining more than 350 other lacrosse legends at the Hall of Fame, located at US Lacrosse headquarters in Baltimore.

The three were selected from a list of 12 finalists. Davis, McKinny and Zvosec combined for more than 25 years of experience on the U.S. Women's National Team and are part of the Class of 2011, which also includes four men.

The National Lacrosse Hall of Fame was established in 1957 to recognize people who contributed to the sport of lacrosse by their ability and deeds as a player, coach, official or administrator.

Traci Davis

Why she's in: AIAW All-Championship Lacrosse Team (1981); U.S. Women's National Team (first team, 1979-1989) and U.S. World Cup Team (1986); U.S. Team Captain in Canadian National Tournament (1985).

The skinny: Davis' commitment to lacrosse has never been in doubt. From high school to college to coaching, Davis' high energy and commitment to improve have been infectious. She earned the title of captain while at Ursinus — and again for the U.S. during the Canadian National Tournament — and never backed down from a challenge.

Opposing teams often had to keep an eye on her from 1979-1982 when she played at Ursinus — after all, she ended up starting for the U.S. Women's National Team for an entire decade. Her leadership always proved a tremendous asset, and she continues to set an example by teaching new generations of student-athletes as a coach/athletic director at Garrison Forest School in Baltimore, where she was named High School Field Hockey Coach of the Year in 2007 by The Baltimore Sun.


Suzanne Honeysett McKinny

Why she's in: Umpired 35 years at high school level, 30 years at collegiate level and 20 years at international level; served on Philadelphia Umpiring Board; U.S. Women's National Team (first team, 1965-1972; reserve, 1962 and 1964).

The skinny: McKinny devoted her life to lacrosse and remained a great ambassador to the sport up until her death. She was an umpire at every level and only stopped when her mobility became a concern. Many regional umpires today can trace their interest in officiating to McKinny, who took every opportunity to introduce the sport to whomever was interested.

McKinny would stay after rating sessions to chat, and she went into schools and clubs to teach lacrosse during her three international tours, in which she played every game. She was also the USWLA treasurer.

She was a four-year player at Ursinus, and lacrosse played a huge role during her entire life.


Sandra Lanahan Zvosec

Why she's in: Two-time All-American (1980, 1981) who won national championship with Maryland in 1981, All-ACC Top-50 Lacrosse Team (2003); National Tournament MVP (1981); U.S. Women's National Team (first team, 1980-1987) and U.S. World Cup Team (1982, 1986).

The skinny: A gymnast-turned-lacrosse player, Zvosec translated that innate agility and speed to quickly become a prolific scorer for Maryland. Her love for lacrosse fueled her career, and she was known for being a hard-nosed player who left everything on the field. She appeared in four AIAW Tournaments and was also on the cover of "Lacrosse" magazine in 1983.

She was named team captain during her senior year, and her leadership helped guide the Terrapins to their first national championship — in addition to helping her procure the prestigious Beth Allen Award. Known for her offensive ability, she's widely considered one of the best lacrosse players to ever suit up in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Click here for more information on the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame, and come back to LaxMagazine.com for coverage of Saturday night's induction ceremony.


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